Voting In-Person

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VOTING AT YOUR POLLING PLACE

Registered voters will be able to cast their vote at their single designated polling place on Election Day

Please note that most long-standing polling places in Delaware County will be open and operational, despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. However, some polling places have been moved due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and other factors. Please be sure to double-check the location of your polling place before you head out to vote. As a reminder, to vote in-person on Election Day you must go to your designated polling location.



Where is my polling place?

Find Your Polling Place [Lookup Tool]
Polling Places List [PDF]
Polling Place Map [Final]

Please be sure to double-check the location of your polling place before you head out to vote. As a reminder, to vote in-person on election day you must go to your designated polling location.



At Your Polling Place

All Delaware County voters will vote using paper ballots. Most voters will hand-mark their ballots, while some voters—including disabled voters who do not have the ability to cast a hand-marked paper ballot—will use the Hart Verity Touch Writer to mark their ballot.

All voters will cast their ballot by feeding it into the Hart Verity Scanner, which will record the vote and signal the voter that the ballot has been cast.

Once the scanner records your vote, it will deposit the paper ballot in the ballot box. Each precinct election board will be able to report its unofficial vote counts from the scanners at the end of the night, using the same process that was followed with the Danaher voting machines that were used through 2019. The paper ballots will be returned with the scanner drives to the County Election Office. The benefit of the new Hart system is that the paper ballots will backstop the scanner counts if an audit or recount is necessary.

How to Vote with the Scanner [PDF]
How to Vote Using Verity Scan [1:01]


Voter Identification

The According to Pennsylvania law, voters are not required to show proof of identification at their polling place unless they are voting at a polling place for the first time. If you have recently registered to vote or have recently moved, please see the following link for approved forms of Voter ID.


If your name is not listed in the poll book

The local officials at your polling place will call the Delaware County Board of Elections to determine if you are registered. If you are, you will be able to vote. However, if the county cannot find your name, but you believe you are registered and have been mistakenly omitted from the poll book, you may vote a provisional ballot.


Provisional ballots

Sometimes the Bureau of Elections needs more time to determine a voter's eligibility to vote. We may ask you to vote with a provisional ballot if, for example, our records indicate that you had previously requested a mail-in ballot for the election. A provisional ballot records your vote while the Elections office determines whether it can be counted.

To check the status of a provisional ballot, use the State’s Provisional Ballot Search tool.



VOTING REMINDERS REGARDING DISABLED VOTERS

If a voter cannot read or write; cannot read the names on the ballots; has difficulty understanding English; or is blind, disabled, or unable to operate the voting machine, the voter has the right to assistance. A voter also has the right to refuse assistance.

Voters may request help from a relative, friend, neighbor, or another voter. Voters do not need to be designated in the poll book district register as “assistance permitted” to receive this assistance.  If a voter wants assistance, the voter will need to sign an Assistance Declaration (unless the poll book already indicates “assistance permitted”).

How to Vote on Verity Touch Writer Ballot Marking Device (Disabled Voters) [2:29]



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About Delaware County

Delaware County, presently consisting of over 184 square miles divided into forty-nine municipalities is the oldest settled section of Pennsylvania.


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